LaBagh Woods Ultra-Local Adventure Ride 22 of 52

Date: June 11, 2017
Distance: under 10 miles of fatbiking and bushwhacking
Weather: Sunny, muggy 90's
Highlights of the ride: Instant escape. Graffiti.


We've reached the point in the summer when it's getting harder and harder to schedule our adventure rides. It's hard to take days off from our highly seasonal business in season. And some of those days off need to be designated for mundane tasks like laundry, taking the cat to the vet, shopping for groceries. Time for adventures has to be fought for and fiercely defended. Days, weeks tick by, and we're only just managing to stick to our goal of 52 adventure rides in 52 weeks.

Adventure this week had to happen on a workday (unlike God, we work on Sundays), and it had to happen before shop hours. The only solution was to keep it ultra-local. Adventure had to begin right outside our front door.

Fortunately, outside our door is LaBagh Woods. It is a gritty, scrappy little strip of urban forest preserve holding on for dear life along the banks of Chicago River's North Branch. But when you dip into the thicket on a fat-tired bike, the oaks are as magnificent, the water as sparkly, and the grasses as sun-dappled as anywhere.

The singletrack, which snakes along on both sides of the river, and branches out on numerous intriguing paths throughout the woods, is highly rideable. We were on fat bikes, but a mountain bike or even a hybrid would be up to the task, provided it has not rained and the ground is bone dry. But there were a lot of branches and logs strewn across the trail, and getting around them required a lot of dismounting and portaging the bikes over obstacles.

These derelict woods can be creepy, and bear evidence of weird, and even sinister human undertakings. So even if you live in one of the adjacent communities, you may not know that this small green space also holds surprises like several hidden ponds, which are hunting grounds for wading birds, tall stands of brilliant yellow irises, and dramatic long-fallen old trees whose decaying carcasses teem with the life of dense mosses, tiny flowers, insects and fungi.

Undersides of bridges and train trestles are bombed with exuberant graffiti, which, like this entire preserve, pulses with vibrant life.

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